Multi-dimensional LGBTQ Liberation During Pride 2014

Multi-dimensional LGBTQ Liberation During Pride 2014

Friday, July 11, 2014

Last month, the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health (NLIRH) joined allies across the nation in recognizing LGBTQ Pride Month – our nation’s annual awareness month and celebration of LGBTQ people, culture, history, and achievements. During Pride NLIRH hosted and participated in a bevy of activities, including marching in the Capital Pride Parade and organizing a Google Hangout about the connection between reproductive justice and LGBTQ liberation. After this peak of activity, we asked Sebastian Velasquez, our Policy Analyst and lead on NLIRH LGBTQ liberation work, to reflect on the significance of Pride and how we celebrated it this year.

By Sebastian Velasquez

In the midst of a more sexually liberated and inclusive United States, Pride is a space where we center solely on celebrating our existence outside of an underground world and the victories brought by the LGBTQ liberation movement. Much of the current approach to combat homophobia is focused on raising awareness and educating others about the incredible diversity within the fluid spectrums of sexual orientation and gender identity. While this is undoubtedly important and essential work, the public displays of affection and acceptance during Pride go beyond this standard in order to celebrate our community.

Pride is an opportunity for people of color, immigrants, and transgender individuals to diversify the faces of LGBTQ people, who confront different forms of systematic oppression. It is for this reason that having multiple ethnic, racial, and ideological transgender and queer groups present during Pride activities provides added value to a movement that – without us – is incomplete in its approach to social justice. During Washington, D.C.’s Capital Pride Parade NLIRH staff organized a reproductive justice contingent, which was led by women and composed by LGBTQ-friendly faith groups, undocumented queers, and gender non-conforming individuals. Our very presence, which is outside of the idealized cisgender Anglo-descendent gay male, was a revolutionary act in itself.

On a daily basis, we continue to push mainstream LGBTQ organizations to be more involved in identity politics that transcend marriage equality and exclusively focus on sexual orientation. As a result, our LGBTQ liberation movement grows stronger in numbers and vision for a more accepting world for ALL people, regardless of their gender identity, sexual orientation, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, or immigration status.

Our approach to Pride was comprised of community and coalition building, civic engagement, and leadership gathering. It was an act of courage and joy to see the people in our RJ contingent that not only understood intersectional work, but also lived in the intersections in their daily lives. This was particularly important because we served as a visual representation of our theme, which was multi-dimensional LGBTQ liberation. Our contingent was comprised of allies from Queer Undocumented Immigrant Project (QUIP), Advocates for Youth, the National Center for Lesbian Rights, and the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice – all of whom were able to reconcile the complex identities held by diverse groups of LGBTQ people from many walks of life.

As an undocumented, queer, Catholic, humanist, and secularist Latin@, I marched next to herman@s who have helped me walk with my chin up and feel proud of every aspect of who I am. For once in an LGBTQ space, I was walking as a whole and not forced to choose between my multiple identities. Our participation in Pride attests to the always growing and comprehensive fight for justice and rights. May the rainbow and all of its colors continue to illuminate our pathway for equity.